Before The Aqua Buddha There Was???


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“Place me on Sunium’s marbled steep,

Where nothing save the waves and I

May hear our mutual murmurs sweep;

There, swan-like, let me sing and die.”

— Lord Byron— Don Juan, Canto iii, Stanza 86, 16

About Jack Cassidy

Don't worry I'm not trying to be a Legitimate blogger.........no time for it and no money in it, just have fun.
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418 Responses to Before The Aqua Buddha There Was???

  1. nebdem says:

    Incoming rant.

  2. BoyInBOYCOTT says:

    Congrats Cisely Tyson,Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf, Pippin, and Kinky Boots.
    I was hoping Ann would win, but honoring Cisely was nice too.

  3. termgirl says:

    Hello, Realm.
    Thought I would share this timeline on surveillance in the US.
    Helped clear up a few misconceptions that I had.
    Hope you find it helpful.
    http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/surveillance-timeline .

    • Lizard Island says:

      Hi TG. I’ll check it out. Been avoiding reading anything about this one.

      • termgirl says:

        Hi, Orcas. Understood. I hesitated to bring it up, to be honest.

        • Ricki Lee says:

          I appreciate this link, tg and am glad you posted it. I’m just curious what misconceptions you had but understand if you’d rather not say.

          • termgirl says:

            That’s okay, RL.
            Well, for one, I didn’t realize FISA was created in 1978;
            not sure when I thought that happened, but I didn’t realize it was 35 years ago.

        • Jack says:

          I had a rant about the before—- there are many reasons i’m pissed still about this issue but mainly this is the source of my discontent. While all this began before the Obama presidency and it was up to us to be informed and call for reform, it was Obama who failed to push for reform. He BUILT on it and now is pissed that this was “leaked”

          The loss of our civl liberties—yeah we built that!!!!

          • termgirl says:

            Agreed. I think it’s interesting that Russ Feingold was the only Senator to vote against the Patriot Act, and we all know what happened to him.

          • Ricki Lee says:

            But then haven’t we been at the mercy of the corporatists for some time regarding our privacy? I relish a discussion regarding this issue if only to hear the perspective of others herein which I would appreciate rather than those on HP. I have to say as one who holds class i fied clea r ances – and the name of which are also, I do have an issue with those who choose to le ak this info mainly from the standpoint that if “we” all did this where the hell would our nation’s security be? I have great issue with these corporations just handing over this information to anyone without any concern whatsoever for the privacy of their customers.

            • termgirl says:

              Yes… we have been at their mercy. I posted something on that very subject a few days ago. There is a paper trail on everyone; everyone who makes a purchase using anything but cash, has a checking account, contributes to a 401K, buys a house, files taxes, etc. etc. But I think dragnet, untargeted surveillance is a big concern, especially when private contractors are mining the data.

              • Ricki Lee says:

                Exactly and I posted the same on HP the other night. This paper trail has been long established. But then I would already consider this a breach of our privacy and has already been serving the dragnet of untargeted surveillance. And forgive me for saying so, in the real scheme of things, this is recent charade is a drop in the already proverbial bucket.

            • Jack says:

              well ‘m about to releak info on the new page. Hells yeah we let corporate america tae all the info they want—hell sometimes we do it willingly to get some stupid trophy — got a nice Yankees world championship towel out of my stupidity.

            • Ricki Lee says:

              I’m subject to many years in prison, as well as fines of $250K for each individual incident if I breach security. I take this chit seriously as an individual. However, I think it’s a double edged sword. But what I expect to hear from this agency is specificity. I don’t agree with the net they’re casting. Especially, in these times of political unrest and no assurances of what’s coming down the pike with the insani_tea party. They may be screaming, but they’ll be the first to use it against the rest of us imo

              • Jack says:

                First don’t not worth the hassle if nothing truly revolutionary comes from such actions, of course I say this as a friend. There’s no doubt that the tea gaggers would do just that but for far too long we have been engaging in long political knee-jerk reactions, time for something new—and t should start with a good house cleaning.

  4. termgirl says:

    Just read about your father-in-law, RL.
    I’m sorry to hear this. My condolences….

  5. Jack says:

    Uh-oh, neb’s rant must be big.

  6. Haruko Haruhara says:

    I might be back?

  7. Beowoof says:

    Maybe I haven’t been paying attention enough, but didn’t all of congress have access to the NSA’s programs before the story leaked? If so, isn’t that just as big a story? As usual, Obama takes the hit, but I had to point that out.

    • termgirl says:

      The President said all of Congress was briefed.
      Some members are saying only members of the Intelligence Committee were briefed, but others could access the info if they “sought it out.”

      • Beowoof says:

        Hey CalifloraGirl——-obviously it was so important, the members thought it best to keep it to themselves. Interesting that in the Frank Church/Jimmy Carter era they could get some good legislation passed.

      • Ricki Lee says:

        What I don’t get is this: these guys – Reps and Senators hold the clearance to be privy to this info but do not necessarily have the intelligence or background to have a clear understanding but their staffers are do and are not cleared to attend these discussions. So why don’t they grant clearances to the staffers? In essence, we are depending on these Congressmen to vote on issues where they have no clear understanding? What’s up with that??!!

        • termgirl says:

          I think the problem is that we elect people who don’t have a clear understanding.

          • termgirl says:

            Also… if they worked more than a few months a year, they would have more time to find out exactly what they’re voting on.

          • Ricki Lee says:

            That is the problem. So they hire staffers who do have a clear understanding on a whole gamut of issues – interpreters so to speak. Let’s face it, we have enough problems finding people to run who don’t have skeletons in their closet.

    • Jack says:

      They did and so did we—but it will never excuse that our constitutional law professor president increased on GWB’s most grievous civil liberties violations —-tell you what i’m pissed off and plan to let Obama now just how I feel by setting a protest. Oh wait Obama has no problem with free speech zones, my bad.

      “…Congress shall make no law …abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.”
      — 1st Amendment

      I guess the attributed Bush quote is applicable after all, “Stop throwing the Constitution in my face…”It’s just a goddamned piece of paper!”

      What we have s a culture of bagger obstruction which pails in comparison to the liberal “GLOSSING OVER” of what the POTUS does wrong.

      Is anyone offended by this? Because GODDAM IT I am.

      • Ricki Lee says:

        With that said, did we really need the Patriot Act with corporatists running amok in the first place? Selling our information to whomever? They have long had access to all of this information and have used it to whatever end they choose to do so. Where is the outrage on that aspect? I use different “names” when I’m seeking information for whatever and am always interested what shows up in my mailbox. I know who they got it from just by the name on the envelope.

        • Jack says:

          Clever trick on the mail requests. corporations care about 1 thing making a buck, we have been stupid in allowing them.

          • Ricki Lee says:

            And they are the problem, Jack! They are the record keepers in this instance and in most. We have knowingly allowed them to maintain this information. What? Like it was never going to go anywhere. I also have to say that when I made a small change on my cell phone account – more minutes or some such – my voice messages disappeared. There was no reason for that to have happened. All of R’s voice messages wiped out. Believe me, I cried about it for days. He had left a crazy message, saying Happy Mother’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Memorial Day, etc,, etc. – it was classic. And the carrier said there was nothing they could do about retrieving these messages. I knew it was codswallop back then and I know it’s codswallop now. I’m more disgusted with the corporations then the Feds at the moment – disgusted with both – just more so the former. FUCK THEM AND THE NRA!

            • Jack says:

              they are not the only ones who are the problem just like Obama is not JUST the problem—In a representative form of government “WE THE PEOPLE” are supposed to make ourselves heard and the fact that this all is happening in the age of communication blows me away.

      • termgirl says:

        I think Obama has a dismal record where civil liberties are concerned. I said that before the election. Our choice was Romney or Obama.
        However, I do think these members of Congress who are claiming ignorance, are disingenuous. They just voted in 2011 to extend the Patriot Act, including Section 215 which gives the government broad powers to seize records.

  8. nebdem says:

    😦 I lost what I wrote

  9. Fluffinator says:

    ISntikwbksl2h2jsi9776llanfoqbflV

  10. nebdem says:

    Edward Snowden leaked information. He stood up and admitted that he did it. He left for Hong Kong and gave the information to a journalist. He should not however be compared or used in the same line of defense as Julian Assange, and Bradley Manning, those are different situations. Snowden indeed broke an oath, but he did so because he felt it was important that the information should be discussed by the American people, this information is important. Some will say that we’ve known about this for a long time, and that it has happened in the past, but that still does not make it acceptable. Soon, Perhaps even now the term “The Patriot Act” is in a word filter and a green flag pops up, well why should it bother us, our grocery stores know everything about what we spend our money in their location on. This is true about grocery stores, but it is an open commitment. Over 9 telecom companies were compelled by law to submit information to the Federal Government, they have an exemption from criminal charges by the law. “As long as the Internet runs on time.”

    • Ricki Lee says:

      And I would say to you that these telecommunication companies at any time could have refused or fought this government intrusion and did not. They could have tied the Fed up in Court. But they did not. They know that handing over this information is wrong, but they did it anyways!

      • Ricki Lee says:

        And let me say, you’re not going to hurt my feelings by pointing out my naivete on this issue. Gypsy was quite nice about doing so the other night. I’m just trying to get a handle on this without sounding totally stupid. Yes, I understand the civil liberties aspect. But when we leave ourselves wide open for this intrusion by way of the corporatists, in the first place, why is anyone so outraged when the government is given access to this same information that the corporatists already have access to? I mean really what are our expectations here? Why do we give the corporatists a “bye” but not the Fed for exactly the same breach? Because of the 4th Amendment? Because they are the Gov? Essentially, we’ve already given the corporatists free reign – what’s the diff?

        • nebdem says:

          In my opinion this is more of a violation of the 3rd Amendment, not the 4th, but also the 4th. All of the points you make are indeed valid, why bitch now when it has always been known? Or that it ought to have been known by now. The reason to keep complaining is because we can see where this is going- “The Minority Report.”

          • Ricki Lee says:

            No, I think my argument is that we willingly give blanket authority to corporations to maintain data with the expectation that they will keep it private. But they don’t. So what are we going to do about it?

            • nebdem says:

              I agree, but by law they are exempt from any criminal charges by the public in reaction to this news. They are extensions now of the government, at their command now. What we can do about it is write to our legislators. That may help, but there is more to this story, the Press is now doing its job, well the UK Press, they are pissed off Royally. .

      • nebdem says:

        I really feel that those companies had no say so in what happened. They’re playing ball.

    • termgirl says:

      I want to learn more about Edward Snowden before I decide what his true motivations are.
      I hope his motivations are pure. If nothing else, he’s woken some people up who’ve been asleep for the last decade.

    • Jack says:

      he will take the brunt of it as a way to discourage future whistle blowers ( I was gong to say leakers 🙂 )

    • Beowoof says:

      Snowden is interesting, but I’m not a fan I of Greenwald. If the left and right had better messengers, these kinds of stories might get the attention they deserve.

      • nebdem says:

        There will be more information coming out next week. Also the reporting originates overseas and that has the ability to fuel this a little longer. Many over look that most of the world was being spied on.

        • Beowoof says:

          Another great point my friend. Silencing discussion with the keys to their past. Rupert Murdoch has taught us all well.

  11. Jack says:

    Well this s exciting isn’t it?

  12. Jack says:

    FLUFF!!!!!!!! One of your comments went into pending —you gotta let me know when this happens otherwise I may not see it.

Comments are closed.