You’re Getting Better


About Fancy Jack

Don't worry I'm not trying to be a Legitimate blogger.........no time for it and no money in it, just have fun.
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871 Responses to You’re Getting Better

  1. waverly says:

    “Send an instant karma to me
    Initial it with loving care” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJM7TdshUbw&feature=kp

  2. waverly says:

    The heck with the Dems on a National level. Vote this Nov to get the GOP scum out of your local district.

    Do the Democrats have a “congenital disease” that keeps them from turning out for mid-term elections? President Obama sure thinks that’s what keeps Democratic voters at home. Obama used the phrase Wednesday at a fundraiser in Denver, Bloomberg News reported. They counted five other times he’s used the phrase at Democratic fundraisers since April 9.

    Both parties, of course, see a substantially lower turnout in non-presidential years, so maybe the disease is catching. Obama’s concern, obviously, is that a low turnout will result in the GOP taking over the Senate as well as perhaps expanding their edge in the House. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/in-the-loop/wp/2014/07/11/obama-diagnoses-democrats-with-congenital-disease/

    • classicalgastoo says:

      I couldn’t agree more with you, wave. I recently had an experience at the local level that really cheesed me off…

      There was a small pre-caucus meeting of local Dems in a neighboring town. Amid much pointless babble, the chairwoman lamented the fact that many of the county positions were going unchallenged by Dems. She sat and whined that it was a shame – but she understood – that there weren’t any Dems in the county who had the time or desire to contest these seats. She was bleating about this in a room with 3 current elected local officials in attendance. This woman can’t even get her email list up to date. ~sigh~

      I’m sure this is not the only local organization in such disarray, and there is a crying need for interested people to step into the chairperson spots to correct the malaise. No fire, at all – no pep talks, no discussion of an ad campaign, no highlighting the need to get the vote out, nothing but a list of shortcomings. Sheesh. As a friend of mine used to mutter: “Where’s the tower, where’s the gun?…”

  3. waverly says:

    A Chinese citizen was charged with plotting to steal data from U.S. defense contractors, including a successful hack of Boeing’s computer system, amid an expanding crackdown on industrial espionage by China. http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2024050363_boeinghackxml.html

    • waverly says:

      The Chinese have been for years relentless in their attack on US aerospace companies, and only who knows what else.

  4. waverly says:

    The second- and third-largest cigarette companies in the United States, Reynolds American and Lorillard, have confirmed that they are in talks to combine. The merger would result in an American cigarette industry dominated by two players — the new combined company and the Altria Group, the maker of the Marlboro brand. http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2014/07/11/how-disruptive-technology-is-spurring-tobacco-merger-talks/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

  5. Update on the Ivory Ban

    WRITTEN
    TESTIMONY FOR THE RECORD
    THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES
    SUBCOMMITTEE ON FISHERIES, WILDLIFE, OCEANS AND INSULAR AFFAIRS
    OVERSI
    GHT
    HEARING ON THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE’S
    PLAN TO IMPLEM
    E
    NT A BAN
    ON
    THE COM
    M
    ERCIAL TRADE IN ELEPHANT IVORY
    JUNE 24, 2014
    RAYMOND M. HAIR, JR.
    INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT
    AMERICAN FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA
    On behalf of the 80,000 members of the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and
    C
    anada
    (AFM)
    and the International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians (ICSOM), a Players’
    Conference within the AFM representing over 4000 musicians in over 51 major symphony and opera
    orchestras throughout the United States
    ,
    I want to thank
    Subcommittee
    Chairman
    John
    Fleming
    and
    Minority
    Committee
    Member
    Alan
    Lowenthal for
    holding
    the June 24, 2014 oversight
    h
    earing
    on the
    plan of the
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    (USFWS)
    to implement a ban on the commercial trade in
    elephant ivory
    .
    The ban has a laudable goal: to shut down the illegal trade in ivory that fuels African
    elephant poaching.
    The AFM supports conservation efforts
    and the fight against
    illegal poaching and
    il
    licit trade in African elephant
    ivory
    .
    However, the
    USFWS Director’s Order 210

    both
    as originally issued on February 2
    5
    , 2014
    (the Order)
    ,
    and as modified on May 14, 2014
    (the Amended Order)

    has had and will continue to
    have the most
    severe of negative
    and unintended cons
    equences on musicians, culture and the music
    industry
    ,
    without
    advancing the goals of the elephant ivory ban,
    reducing
    illegal
    ivory
    trade or diminishing
    elephant
    poaching
    in Africa
    because of its restrictions on musical instruments
    .
    Although elephant ivory was once used in small amoun
    ts in the manufacture of some musical
    instruments, th
    is
    has
    not been
    the case
    for decades. However, t
    housands of musicians
    now
    own
    musical instruments that
    lawfully
    contain small amounts of
    elephant
    ivory.
    The
    se musicians did not buy
    their
    instruments for the de minimis amounts of ivory they contain, but for
    the
    ir
    acoustic
    and handling
    properties unrelated to ivory
    per se
    . The
    use and sale
    of these musical instruments does not fuel the
    illegal ivory tr
    ade.
    But the Amended Order nevertheless impose
    s
    severe r
    estrictions on
    musicians’
    ability to
    perform
    internationally with the
    se
    instruments,
    and will erode
    the
    instruments’
    economic value, causing great
    harm to our musical culture
    as well as great economic harm to our nation’s musical artists
    .
    Although the
    Ame
    nded Order
    sought to
    correct problems created by the Order’s restrictions on
    the ability of
    musicians to travel with their instruments, it
    fails to provide a clear, practical and reliable system for
    permitting such travel.
    The AFM submits this written te
    stimony for the record in order to show, first, that m
    usical instruments
    containing small amounts of ivory
    simply
    should be exempted from the ivory ban
    , and second, that a
    t a
    minimum, the application of the Amended Order and any new rules
    regarding
    musical
    instruments
    should be held in abeyance until
    clear, reliable and non

    burdensome means of compliance are worked
    through with stakeholders.
    The AFM and Its Universe of Stakeholders
    The AFM is the largest labor organization in the world representing
    professional musicians, and possibly
    the oldest, having been founded in 1896. The AFM represents musicians in such diverse workplaces as
    motion picture and sound recording studios, live theaters, symphony, opera and ballet orchestras,
    hotels, lounges, tou
    rs and every other sort of venue large and small.
    The AFM has also represented the
    legislative and policy interests of working musicians since at least 1907, when
    operetta composer Victor
    Herbert was asked and
    appeared before
    Congress in support of copyri
    ght reforms on behalf of
    composers and the AFM.
    T
    he AFM
    is
    firmly
    committed to raising industry standards and placing the
    professional musician in the foreground of the cultural landscape
    and relevant policy debates
    .
    AFM
    members
    comprise the broadest i
    maginable universe of
    performing musicians
    .
    W
    e
    perform as
    jazz, classical, folk, country, rhythm and blues, world music, Latin, Asian
    , salsa, samba, polka, hip

    hop
    and rock artists
    in over 200 affiliated locals
    (
    see
    attached list of AFM Locals)
    througho
    ut the United
    States and Canada
    .
    W
    e
    are found in the professional ranks of major and regional symphonic, operatic
    and ballet orchestras, musical theater pits, major motion picture sound studios,
    night clubs,
    city music
    festivals
    , and
    traditiona
    l city

    community concert and drum

    and

    bugle style bands
    .
    W
    e
    teach in schools,
    universities and private studios, thus training new generations of artists.
    Contrary to popular misconception
    s
    , most musicians are ne
    ither rich nor celebrities, nor is
    o
    urs
    a life of
    effortless play.
    W
    e
    have natural talent, but only hard work and practice will hone
    o
    ur
    art. Full

    time jobs
    in music are rare. Most professional musicians struggle to earn a decent living, and a successful
    musician
    is likely to be a person
    of extraordinary musical gifts earning
    , at best,
    a modest, middle

    class
    livelihood.
    For professional musicians,
    o
    ur
    musical instrument
    is
    a crucial tool of the trade, and more

    it is
    o
    ur
    voice
    .
    A m
    usician choose
    s
    his or her instrument
    with the utmost care for sound, playability and
    personal suitability, and
    then practices and performs on it
    until the instrument is
    an extension of the
    musician’s artistic self. Musicians’ instruments may range in value from
    $1
    ,
    000.00 to $10,000,000.00
    ;
    f
    or most musicians it is a major investment, and its economic value is as crucial to the musician’s future
    economic well

    being as its
    acoustic quality
    is crucial to his or her artistic expression
    .
    I cannot emphasize
    too strongly the importance of instrumen
    ts to musicians and the music industry: p
    rofessional musicians
    depend on their instruments to earn a living
    and give voice to their artist expression
    , student musicians
    to learn their art, and amateur musicians to express themselves in their homes and com
    munities.
    AFM members recognize the dignity of work and the value artists and supporters of the arts place on
    that work. With the execution of every musical note,
    w
    e
    strive for perfection in both practice and
    2
    performance.
    W
    e
    k
    now
    that perfection
    demanded by
    o
    ur
    commitment to the art can only be achieved
    through
    o
    ur
    instruments.
    Musical Instruments
    Containing De Minimis Amounts of Ivory
    Should Be Exempt From the Ban
    At the June 24, 2014 oversight hearing, Ms. Arian Sheets, Curator of Stringed Instruments at the
    National Music Museum, provided the Subcommittee with
    clear testimony that while twentieth century
    instrument makers used small amounts of elephant ivory
    (ofte
    n less than one gram)
    in certain musical
    instruments, elephant ivory has not been used in the manufacture of musical instruments for decades.
    Thus, the contemporary manufacture of musical instruments neither provides a market for illegally

    traded ivory no
    r fuels the African elephant poaching that feeds that illegal market.
    It is also clear that the continued existence, sale and use of thousands of
    what Ms. Sheets calls “
    vintage

    instruments that contain small amounts of elephant ivory from earlier decades
    ,
    when such use was
    lawful
    ,
    also
    does not feed the illegal ivory market nor encourage elephant poaching
    . As I explained
    above,
    musicians select
    instruments for the quality of the instrument’s tone and the highly
    individualized sense of the instrument
    ’s suitability for
    artistic talent and desires.
    W
    e
    do not select
    instruments for the minimal amounts of elephant ivory they may contain; ivory is irrelevant to the
    musical value of the instrument. Bluntly stated, musical instruments are not bough
    t and sold for ivory,
    and
    in
    the wake of
    all the furor that erupted over the Order and the Amended Order, the AFM is
    unaware of
    any
    evidence that the import, export, interstate sale or intrastate sale of musical
    instruments has any effect on illegal ivory
    trafficking or elephant poaching.
    1
    The AFM understands that the difficulty facing the USFWS is
    that
    of determining which vintage
    instruments contain lawfully

    obtained, pre

    Convention elephant ivory, and which, perhaps, do not. But
    the approach taken in
    the Order a
    nd the Amended Order, which put
    an impossible burden on ordinary
    citizen

    musicians to ascertain and document the provenance of the
    small amounts of
    ivory in their
    instruments

    which were never purchased for their ivory in the first place, and a
    bout which sufficient
    documentation may be impossible to obtain

    puts an extraordinary hardship on musicians with no
    countervailing benefit
    for wildlife conservation. Musicians are terrified to take their instruments on tour
    to foreign engagements, for f
    ear of confiscation upon return to the United States
    , no matter what steps
    they have taken, because t
    he
    permitting process is full of obstacles and may be impossible to fulfill with
    certainty. Middle

    class musicians
    can ill afford for their instruments

    which represent a major
    investment for them

    to lose value b
    ecause they cannot be sold in inter

    or intra

    state commerce. And
    these harms
    will have an adverse effect on the arts generally, from symphony, opera and ballet
    1
    Indeed, the USFWS has acknowledged that precluding the movement of musical instruments
    containing CITES pre

    Convention or antique ivory “would not benefit elephant conservation” and such
    movements “do not contribute to poaching and illegal trade.”
    USFWS M
    oves to Ban Commercial
    Elephant Ivory Trade Questions and Answers
    ,
    http://www.fws.gov/international/travel

    and

    trade/ivory

    ban

    questions

    and

    answers.html
    ,
    see
    answer to “Why not impose a complete ban on all import, export
    and domestic sale?”
    3
    orchestra institutions to ethnic
    “world music” groups
    (and groups performing in every genre imaginable)
    to the viability of foreign cultural exchanges.
    In light of the fact that the practice of inserting small amounts of elephant ivory in musical instruments
    ended decades ago, the lack
    of evidence that travel, use and sale of musical instruments with small
    amounts of ivory has any ill effect on wildlife conservation, and the harms with which the Amended
    Order will burden musicians in particular and the arts generally, the AFM believes th
    at musical
    instruments should be exempted from the Amended Order.
    The Application of the Amended Order and Any New Rules on Musical Instruments Containing Small
    Amounts of Elephant Ivory Should be Held in Abeyance Pending Establishment of Clear, Reliable a
    nd
    Non

    Burdensome Means of Compliance
    If musical instruments containing small amounts of elephant ivory are not to be completely exempted
    from the application of the Amended Order and other conservation regulations,
    their application
    should, at a minimum,
    be deferred until the USFWS (and any other relevant government agencies) have
    consulted with stakeholders in the music and arts
    communities
    and reached agreements upon clear,
    reliable and non

    burdensome methods of compliance.
    In his testimony during the J
    une 24, 2014 oversight hearing, David J. Hayes, Vice

    Chair of the Advisory
    Council on Wildlife Trafficking, noted that the Advisory Council had “urge[d] the Interior Department’s
    Fish & Wildlife Service to work with the regulated community to provide non

    b
    urdensome
    permit
    approvals for non

    commercial import and export of products that contain ivory (e.g., orchestra
    instruments that contain ivory; traveling museum exhibitions, etc.), and for clear and reasonable burden
    of proof standards that qualify ivory p
    roducts as “antiques” that are exempt from the Endangered
    Species Act.”
    But t
    o date, the application of the Amended Order has been unclear, unreliable, and burdensome.
    Musicians of all types

    those who tour as musicians employed by orchestra institutions, those who tour
    in their own small groups or as solo performers in all types
    of musical genres, and those who simply own
    vintage instruments
    and fear their loss or devaluation

    have suffered from uncertainty that hurts the
    arts and does nothing for wildlife conservation.
    The Order
    Immediately upon
    issuance
    of t
    he
    February
    25
    , 201
    4
    Order, the American music industry was
    thrown
    into turmoil.
    It is no exaggeration to say that AFM
    musicians
    in the United States and
    Canada
    experienced
    panic
    at the thought that
    under the immediate enforcement provisions of the Order, they
    faced the pos
    sible confiscation of their instruments containing small amounts of ivory upon returning
    from foreign tours, and had no clear idea
    and no government guidance regarding
    how to comply with
    the Order to avoid such extreme results
    .
    The
    AFM worked
    hard to unta
    ngle the new rules regarding
    travel in and out of the country, but there
    upon issuance of the Order there
    was no one central
    government
    source of reliable answers to the myriad of confounding questions raised by the Order and
    its immediate enforcement
    .
    4
    T
    he AFM and other organizations
    were able to assist t
    wo major
    U
    .
    S
    .
    symphony orchestras whose
    player
    s, all members of AFM Locals in Boston and New York
    , were
    already
    scheduled to travel overseas
    within a few months
    . But it was impossible meet the needs of the many non

    orchestral musical groups
    who were booked to perform overseas and had no guarantee that they would be able to return safely
    with
    their musical instruments

    because it was impossible to determine up

    t
    o

    date, conclusive and
    accurate directions about how to navigate customs and immigration with instruments containing small
    amounts of ivory. There were some
    indefensible
    confiscations of instruments
    that may have been
    related to African ivory
    , and
    the unc
    ertainties surrounding the Order allowed
    rumor and misinformation
    to
    spread through the music industry like wildfire.
    The AFM became convinced that
    complications would continue
    unless and
    until
    musical instruments
    either were exempted from the Order, or we
    re subjected to clear, reliable and non

    burdensome rules
    .
    As I
    wrote to
    President Obama
    ,
    “the language in the Order creates insurmountable obstacles that the
    average citizen musician cannot navigate due to the lack of a One

    Stop government site that provi
    des
    necessary guidance
    .

    (
    See
    attached letter to Presi
    dent Obama dated April 4, 2014.)
    I wrote a similar
    letter to the
    Congressional Black Caucus, Con
    gressional Hispanic Caucus and
    Congressional Asian Pacific
    American Caucus,
    to
    advise t
    hem
    the Order lik
    ely would adversely
    impact diverse mu
    sical cultural
    constituencies, including groups that travel with
    special indigenous non

    traditional musical instruments
    that may contain ivory
    .
    (
    See
    attached letter to the Congressional caucuses dated April 4, 2014.)
    In that
    letter, I
    request
    ed
    and recommended the exemption of
    musical instruments
    from the Order until such
    time
    as
    US
    FWS issued an orderly plan that would allow artists to smoothly traver
    se the system assuring
    guaranteed, safe importation of their valued musical instruments through customs and immigration
    upon return.
    Last but certainly not least, the AFM and partner organizations met with the USFWS to urge that the
    needs of the music co
    mmunity could and should be met without any harm to wildlife conservation.
    The Amended Order
    Due to considerable pressure brought about by the AFM and its national music partners, t
    he USFWS
    issued the Amended Order o
    n
    May 15,
    2014
    . Though
    we
    welcome
    d
    the
    Amended
    Order
    ’s expansion of
    the date related to sales and trade of musical instruments, the Amended Order
    did not
    go far enough to
    mitigate the burdens and harms
    caused by including musical instruments containing small amounts of
    ivory within the purview
    of the elephant ivory ban
    .
    The following are only some of the ongoing
    problems under the Amended Order and potential new regulations.
    The Burden of Proof
    and the Lack of Clarity Surrounding Applications for CITES Certificates
    The Amended Order allows the
    import/export (i.e., foreign tours and returns to the United States) of
    musical instruments containing worked elephant ivory that was legally acquired and removed from the
    wild prio
    r
    to February 26, 1
    9
    76
    (the date that the African elephant was
    listed unde
    r the Convention on
    International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)),
    and
    not sold since February 25, 2014. This would
    cover an enormous number of musical instruments, except for the following critical practical problem:
    the burden of proving
    that the
    minimal amount of ivory in a musical instrument was taken from the wild
    5
    pre

    CITES is often impossible to meet. Numerous instruments, including many of the finest examples
    that are prized by musicians for their playing qualities, were crafted with small am
    ounts of ivory long
    before CITES existed
    . Violin bows, for example, are often extremely old. None of these instruments,
    and very few others, would have been provided with documentation regarding their ivory content, most
    especially because the instrument
    s were never valued for the minimal amounts of ivory they might
    contain but only for their ability to produce sounds.
    2
    Simply put, i
    t is unreasonable to impose a burden
    of proof
    upon citizen

    musicians that simply cannot be
    met, particularly given the
    lack of connection between musical instruments and the illegal ivory trade.
    If the USFWS persists in believing that musicians should be required to make some showing regarding
    the
    likely
    source of any ivory in a musical instrument
    (though a showing far s
    hort of proving provenance
    where proof is impossible)
    , the showing that should be required to obtain a CITES
    certificate (or other
    “musical passport”)
    must be informed by practical reality, determined in conjunction with musicians and
    experts on musical in
    struments, and accompanied by clear, consistent and reliable guidance and
    directions
    (including to enforcement officials)

    before it is enforced.
    At present,
    even with the issuance
    of a new musical instrument permit number 3

    200

    88, appropriate governmen
    t “required”
    documentation needed to prove the source of any ivory in the instrument is unclear.
    Resolution of Economic Issues Relating to Seizures of Legally Purchased Musical Instruments
    The AFM understands that fines
    have recently been
    levied on confi
    scated musical instruments and their
    component parts, with no system in place to reimburse affected artists whose instruments may
    eventually be deemed to be perfectly lawful.
    There is currently no system in place to reimburse musicians for the value of law
    ful instruments that are
    damaged or destroyed in inspection or enforcement efforts. Musical instruments are fragile, and
    instruments suspected of being in violation of regulations may be damaged or
    destroyed if inspected
    and mis
    handled by non

    experts. As
    an economic matter, regulations must provide for compensation in
    such circumstances. As a practical matter,
    regulatory language
    must be developed in
    cooperation
    with
    musicians and instrument experts to ensure that
    it
    appropriately protect
    s
    valuable instr
    uments during
    any physical inspection.
    Preventing Devaluation of Musical Instruments
    As I described above, musical instruments are major investments for working musicians and music
    students. Regulations that prevent the sale of
    musical instruments containing
    minimal amounts of
    African
    elephant ivory will do nothing to prevent the illegal ivory t
    rade, but will radically reduce the
    2
    Indeed, it is not only difficult for musicians to determine or document the ivory (or lack thereof) in
    their instruments. The AFM understands that there is at leas
    t one documented case of an instrument
    being confiscated by U.S. officials because it was suspected to contain elephant ivory, when it fact it
    contained none.
    6
    economic value of musical instruments, threatening the livelihoods,
    capital investment,
    and future
    re
    tirement
    of musicians
    , as well as preventing a new generation of musicians from benefitting from
    some of the finest musical instruments in existence
    . This is a most serious problem, not only for
    individual musicians, but for the music and arts community as a whole, and must be addressed.
    Insufficient Number of Ports of Exit and R
    e

    entry to the United States
    At time of
    the
    issuance of the
    Amended O
    rder
    until now
    ,
    the
    USFWS made no effort to accomplish
    targeted,
    effective
    public education
    regarding
    the need
    , under the Amended Order,
    to exit and enter
    the United States through designated ports
    . Moreover, c
    iting cost
    prohibit
    ions
    during our meetings
    , the
    USFWS
    would
    not consider expanding the number of ports available to musicians re

    entering the U
    nited
    S
    tates
    wi
    th affected musical instruments.
    These problems must be rectified. And, as noted above,
    reliable techniques for di
    stinguishing
    African
    elephant ivory from other materials must be developed,
    and safe procedures for the handling and protection of musical instruments must be developed
    with
    instructions clearly filtered down to enforcement officials
    .
    International Inquiri
    es
    I have written at length about American musicians, but
    AFM and non

    AFM
    Canadian musicians cross
    daily into the United States
    , and there is no clarity regarding the
    documentation they now need
    to bring
    their musical
    instruments
    into the United States.
    New regulations now imposed by the United States
    government have added additional layers to the travel procedures Canadian musicians follow, which
    already include immigration verification, work permits, and the Canadian government requirement for
    musicians
    to obtain an ATA Carnet, just to name a few.
    Similarly, international musicians committed to
    perform in the United States, often as part of important cultural exchanges, suffer from uncertainty
    regarding requirements and their ability to obtain appropria
    te CITES documentation.
    Conclusion
    In addition to thanking the Subcommittee for its attention to this critical issue, I would also like to
    t
    han
    k
    officials of the
    USFWS
    for
    their
    continued
    responsiveness to the concerns of the music community
    .
    But
    as the
    consideration of these issues continues, the AFM urges Congress, the Administration and the
    USFWS
    to
    take to heart the plight of the working musician and the music industry at large.
    In this regard, i
    t is worth noting that musical instrument makers and
    the music industry generally have
    been leaders, not followers, in the conservation of wildlife, given the fact that they discontinued the use
    of ivory
    in musical instruments decades ago. Many musical instruments lawfully containing small
    amounts of elepha
    nt ivory remain in use, and they have extraordinary artistic and financial value to
    musicians and the arts. T
    he AFM believes that a full moratorium
    for musicians and their instruments
    should be placed on the
    application of the Amended Order and any other
    new rules to
    music
    al
    instruments
    ,
    either permanent
    ly
    , or, at a minimum,
    until such time all issues are resolved
    i
    n conjunction
    with stakeholders
    and
    clear
    final guidelines and documentation are
    published
    on the USFWS website.
    7
    Respectfully submitted,
    Ray
    mond M. Hair
    ,
    International President
    American Federation of Musicians
    of the United States and Canada
    Bruce Ridge, Chairman
    International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians (ICSOM)
    8

    • mmm, didn’t print out well, but it’s all there.

      • classicalgastoo says:

        Dawg, do you have a version that might be good for friends and supporters to send to the people who should see it? That, with a list of committee members, would be something I would be happy to spread around and send in.

        There are a ton of amateur musicians and their friends here who would probably be happy to sign and mail copies of such a letter.

    • bebe says:

      Thanks for posting…..very important for real musicians .
      So many are making shortcuts by recording from electronic sounds. it is not the same…hurts my ears. .
      I am all for true musicians.

  6. Darth says:

    Miami will be swallowed as sea levels rise, but the climate change deniers who run it look the other way
    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/07/11/miami-will-be-swallowed-as-sea-levels-rise-but-the-climate-change-deniers-who-run-it-look-the-other-way/

  7. fi says:

    Good evening, anyone around?

  8. waverly says:

    The Trouble With Brain Science

    “It’s not just that scientists lack answers. We don’t even agree on the questions we should be asking. … biological complexity is only part of the challenge in figuring out what kind of theory of the brain we’re seeking. What we are really looking for is a bridge, some way of connecting two separate scientific languages — those of neuroscience and psychology.

    Such bridges don’t come easily or often, maybe once in a generation, but when they do arrive, they can change everything. An example is the discovery of DNA, which allowed us to understand how genetic information could be represented and replicated in a physical structure. In one stroke, this bridge transformed biology from a mystery — in which the physical basis of life was almost entirely unknown — into a tractable if challenging set of problems, such as sequencing genes, working out the proteins that they encode and discerning the circumstances that govern their distribution in the body.

    Neuroscience awaits a similar breakthrough. We know that there must be some lawful relation between assemblies of neurons and the elements of thought, but we are currently at a loss to describe those laws. We don’t know, for example, whether our memories for individual words inhere in individual neurons or in sets of neurons, or in what way sets of neurons might underwrite our memories for words, if in fact they do.” http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/12/opinion/the-trouble-with-brain-science.html?_r=0

    Ahh, from where doth thought originate, that is the question 🙂

    • Hobette says:

      I’ve often considered donating my brain to science–that would give them lots to think about! 😉

  9. waverly says:

    Here’s an interesting article for Liz – Exploring Vashon Island by kayak
    Rent a paddlecraft in Quartermaster Harbor for a quiet wander or get adventurous and circle the island. http://seattletimes.com/html/outdoors/2024031487_kayakingvashonoutdoorsxml.html

  10. Darth says:

    Woman Finds Stack Of Anti-Hillary ‘Lewinsky’ Bumper Stickers At GOP Office
    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/gop-office-lewinsky-bumper-stickers

  11. Man, the Ramones had to be the most star-crossed band ever. They’re all gone now.

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/12/showbiz/tommy-ramone-dead/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

  12. waverly says:

    I so miss Bobby Kennedy. On June 5th 1968, at the ripe old age of 13 is when I lost hope.

    The 1968 presidential campaign of Robert Kennedy centered on two distinct yet inseparable themes: The blood-soaked immorality of the Vietnam War, and the astonishing fact that the richest nation on Earth tolerated the enormous poverty and deprivations suffered by its poorest citizens while vomiting billions of dollars into the bucket of that war. He spent 82 days shouting these desperately uncomfortable truths from the rooftops, until he was laid low. http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/24908-william-rivers-pitt-|-the-lost-lingering-legacy-of-robert-f-kennedy

    • waverly says:

      This is what happens when you shout desperate uncomfortable truths from the rooftops.

      You get shot.

  13. Hey, Jack put up a Ramones background.

    • waverly says:

      “His eyes are opening. Krugman started as a mainstream liberal. So did Joe Stiglitz. And they are seeing the limits of liberalism. Both are moving toward becoming class warriors for working people.”

      Indeed

  14. Hobette says:

    First AND First Last! 😀

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